Make Flowering Hormone at Home

Humic acid , fulvic acid and gibberellic acids are important ingredients in building soils that help plants flower. In this day of internet resources, you can search for these terms and learn more than you possibly wanted to know (impossible!!) . Basic notes follow this recipe for a growth medium you can make at home, especially if you live in a farming community. It contains all three acids.

Recipe:

Collect old, dry cow manure patties. Aim for patties that have lain in a pasture for more than 1 1/2 years. It’s fun being outside! Probably want to use gloves…

Soak cow patties in a bucket of water for at least 7 days. The patties will float at first but will eventually sink to the bottom. You can also press them down with some sort of lid that is weighted with a large rock or brick. Imagine a cheese press. I didn’t bother.

At the end of 7 days or so, the water should be a rich dark brown. Pour this off into another container and add an equal amount of water. This is your fertilizer. Pour it on the base of plants.

Humic Acid: This is a powerful root zone soil builder, allowing more nutrients to be carried from the soil to the roots. It is found in decomposed organic matter, hence the reason for using well-aged manure. Humic acid also helps hold onto nutrients in the soil, keeping them from leaching away too quickly. Mycorrhizae serve much the same function.

Fulvic Acid: It is also found in materials decomposed by microbial action. Again, the reason for aged manure. It serves the same function as humic acid, aiding in making soil nutrients more available to roots. Interestingly, some people take fulvic acid internally to help boost immunity.

Gibberellic acid: This acid is useful in longer stem growth and flower production. It was discovered accidentally by scientists in Japan studying abnormally long rice stems.

More fuel for your fireplace? Some gardeners remove and dry the cow patties after making their fertilizer. Then they burn them as fuel. Would it be smelly?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s